U.s.-Oman Free Trade Agreement

U.s.-Oman Free Trade Agreement

International investment agreements (AI) are divided into two types: (1) bilateral investment agreements and (2) investment contracts. A bilateral investment agreement (ILO) is an agreement between two countries to promote and protect investments made by investors from the countries concerned in the territory of the other country. The vast majority of IDu are bits. The category of contracts with investment rules (TIPs) includes different types of investment contracts that are not BITs. There are three main types of TIPs: 1) global economic contracts that contain commitments that are often included in ILOs (. B, for example, a free trade agreement with an investment chapter); 2. contracts with limited investment provisions (for example. B, investment creation or free transfer of investment-related funds; and 3) contracts that contain only “framework clauses,” such as. B on investment cooperation and/or a mandate for future investment negotiations. In addition to IDAMIT, there is also an open category of investment-related instruments (IRIs).

It includes various binding and non-binding instruments, such as model agreements and draft instruments, multilateral conventions on dispute settlement and arbitration rules, documents adopted by international organisations and others. The free trade agreement with Oman is similar to other ales mefta and consists of three fundamental components: new customs plans, comprehensive market-opening commitments and provisions to support them, as well as the protection of labour and the environment. It allows almost all consumer goods and industry immediate duty-free access, with specific provisions for agriculture, textiles and clothing. A step back from GSP. In addition, the AFL-CIO sees the US-Oman-FTA as a step backwards from the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) program. Under the GSP, trade preferences for developing countries, including Oman, are conditional on the implementation of measures taken by these countries to implement internationally recognized workers` rights. A challenge to the GSP`s authorisation for each country begins with a petition to the Office of the USTR, which shows that a country takes no action to grant such rights to its workers. In June 2005, the AFL-CIO asked the USTR to withdraw Oman from GSP status on the grounds that it did not grant its workers the rights of internationally recognized workers29.


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