Ca Budget Agreement

Ca Budget Agreement

Lawmakers have flatly rejected Newsom`s cuts to schools and a wide range of social services and insisted the state extend the deadline for new federal funds until the end of September, before finding an additional $14 billion in budget savings. Some unions have already agreed with the governor on cuts. The state`s main union, service employees International Union Local 1000, announced Friday that its members would be fired two days a month for two years, in exchange for a suspension of their health contributions for retirees. “Over the past decade, we`ve worked hard to be able to weather such a storm,” Atkins said during Monday`s vote. “This budget allows us to get through it responsibly and accurately, so we no longer devastate the lives of Californians.” Newsom and the legislature are facing a delay until July 1 and have been negotiating a particularly difficult budget for several weeks. The coronavirus pandemic has plunged the state into recession and caused government revenues to plummet. This resulted in a projected deficit of $54 billion for next year; Proposition 98, the formula that determines spending for community colleges and K-12 schools, is expected to decrease by $14 billion, from what Newsom proposed in January, to $70 billion $US. Local governments also feared that even a more generous budget than the preferred version of Newsom would still be overlooked. The deal is expected to provide only about one-third of the $3 billion tax shortfall to counties that are used to fund public health and psychological programs, social services and public safety. The coronavirus pandemic has decimated the state`s coffers, forcing Newsom to cut more than $6 billion in new spending announced in its initial budget proposal in January, and to look for other areas it can cut.

If you read the full budget, parents who want to enroll their children in “hybrid” charter schools may not do so. In the budget, the charter school is funded by this model on the basis of a 19/20 presence, and not at 20/21 as in other public schools. This means that these schools cannot increase the previous year`s enrolment because they do not receive funds for new students. Twenty years from now, we will realize that the real thorn in the back of this budget was to allow school districts to sell real estate and use the proceeds for on-going operating costs. This is used to incentivize districts to maintain spending levels they can`t afford. Our district sold school sites in the 1980s, when enrollment declined after the baby boom and the 13-bit proposition. We have spent the last 15 years caring for children. Read More “This is a tough budget for all of us,” Newsom said Friday about the negotiations. .

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